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I always make it a point to never open any mail that I didn’t expect coming. If it looks like something I am supposed to get I will open it and if not, it goes into the trash.

Same thing with food, if I get food in the mail like a product sample I will usually leave that alone for a while a least.

The fact of the matter is, you have to be really careful with what you handle that comes in the mail. You never know if it is going to be something that is intended to harm you.

When a Utah woman opened her mailbox and found two small white packages, she expected to find a pair of earrings inside. Although Lori Culley wasn’t expecting any jewelry—especially jewelry shipped from China—the words “stud earrings” were clearly typed on the China Post labels.

But when she opened the vinyl envelopes, she found two small baggies filled with some kind of seeds. She posted pictures on Facebook, writing that it was “pretty scary” to receive unsolicited seeds from outside the United States, and she quickly received comments from at least 40 others who said that they’d also received mysterious packages of seeds that had been labeled “earrings” or “wire connectors” on the mailers.

Orange fruit seeds on white background, Close up shot, Selective focus

“There was an article that I found in the UK saying this has been happening over there, and they are bad seeds, they are invasive,” she told FOX 13. “I hope that it’s nothing too serious. Don’t throw them in the garbage. Don’t plant them. Don’t touch them.”

Culley contacted the Utah Department of Agriculture, who echoed that advice, asking anyone who has also received a package of the seeds to reach out to them. After similar reports were received in Washington, that state’s Department of Agriculture wrote on Facebook that “unsolicited seeds” should not be planted. “This is known as agricultural smuggling,” the Department wrote. “Report it to USDA and maintain the seeds and packaging until USDA instructs you what to do with the packages and seeds. They may be needed as evidence.”

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